Be a Good Camping Neighbor

Being a good Camping Neighbor is about respect. It just takes a little common sense and thinking from the other persons' perspective. You have to be considerate for other campers, the campground, and nature. Make sure the kids know the rules as well.


  • Read and respect the campground's rules and policies. Just because you don't understand why they do things a certain way, doesn't mean they don't have a reason.
  • Do not walk through another camper's site, walk around it. Even if you are going to the bathrooms. While someone is camping think of their site as their yard.
  • Limit noise from 10 pm until 6 am. At night noise carries far so keep this in mind. Yes I'm sure you like loud music, but that is why they make headphones. You can enjoy it so your neighbor doesn't have to. Keep in mind that RV walls are thin and sound carries through it. 
  • Leave no trace at the campsite before you leave. Do a final walk through even once it's time to leave.
  • Drive slowly through the campground. Follow any posted speed limits and watch for children. 
  • Don't leave your engine running more than a minute and turn on your parking lights if it's late at night so you don't shine someone's tent.
  • Be sure to check out on time. If it's a busy campground there may be people waiting. 
  • Stay on recommended trails when hiking. This keeps damage to vegetation and erosion in one place.
  • Do not feed the wildlife as this encourages them to interact with and become dependent on humans.

Hygiene and Waste

  • Dispose of your waste water into the nearest dump station or a drain.
  • Use biodegradable soap.
  • Clean up all food and scraps from picnic tables you use. Nobody likes showing up to their campsite to find hordes of ants and other bugs.
  • Make sure when you leave your campsite it is cleaner than when you arrived.


  • Always clean up after your pets to avoid unnecessary smells and from annoying other campers who may step in their poop.
  • Do not leave your pets unattended. They will likely bark at strangers, dig holes and annoy your fellow campers.
  • Always have them on a leash (6 feet or less in length).
  • Check ahead of time to confirm the campground you plan to stay at allows pets. Some campgrounds have a no pet policy.

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  • Many campgrounds will have it posted if you are not allowed to have a campfire. Some campgrounds have portable fire pits to burn in so as not to destroy the grass areas and leave burnt rings.
  • Check with campground management before collecting any wood. Many allow you to collect deadwood rather than cutting down live trees.
  • Only burn wood and paper in your campfire.
  • Do not leave your campfire unattended. Always completely extinguish your campfire when sleeping or leaving your campsite.


Follow these guidelines and everyone in your camping party and campground should have a good time.